Indigenous Peoples’ Day – Everyday

Indigenous Peoples’ Day – Everyday

This week, as every week, we’re writing to you from the traditional lands and village sites of the Multnomah, Wasco, Cowlitz, Kathlamet, Clackamas, Tualatin Kapaluya, Molalla, bands of Chinook, and many other Tribes and peoples that have made their homes along the Columbia and Willamette Rivers since time immemorial. Today, Indigenous folks from over 380 tribes live and thrive in the place we now call Portland; here, colonization and Indigenous resistance both persist into the present.

Every day is Indigenous People’s Day when we’re residing on and benefitting from stolen land. The climate justice movement in particular owes so much to Indigenous leaders and communities, who both live on the front lines of the climate crisis and lead the fight against its root causes. From Standing Rock to Wet’suwet’en Territory to the Klamath Tribes to O’Odham Jewed, Indigenous land and water defenders have long stood as the first line of defense against the greatest harms of the extractive economy.

Land defense doesn’t stop with pipelines. Around the world, when Indigenous communities manage land, forests, and resources, carbon sequestration and conservation outcomes improve. As we work to end the climate crisis, we can’t stop at keeping fossil fuels in the ground: we must be just as invested in keeping land in Indigenous hands, and in returning that which has already been stolen.

Wondering what you can do to take action in solidarity beyond Indigenous People’s Day? Here’s some places to start: